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Old 09-Aug-13, 05:32   #51
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My next images will be more rock paintings from Jabbaren which alot of Eurocentric are presenting to support their claim that the original Berbers (Libyans) have a European origin just like the AE (KMT).
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Old 09-Aug-13, 07:08   #52
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Stunning pictures.
Can you indicate whether kerma was established during any of these periods.
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Old 15-Aug-13, 09:26   #53
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Hello piankhy how are you thanks for the comments. To answer your question the period was 5500 yrs ago, that would be about the beginning of the Pastoral period. But new studies have yeilded more info. I remember about five yrs ago maybe longer an Sudanse authority who said Kerma goes back 8000 yrs. There was also a physical archaeologist report on the escavation done in Northern Sudan some yrs ago which confirms what the Sudanes authority had said. I can't remember his name. This would put Kerma around the begininning of the Roundhead period.

As a matter of if I recall there other settlements mentioned in those report that are much older than Kerma. Right now I am without my external hard drive. I will came back later when I have my external hardrive, that way I can give you more specific details an the name of the Sudanes Guy. If you would like I can send you that archaeology report. Let me know Thanks.
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Old 21-Aug-13, 08:29   #54
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All archeological work in Africa have been done predominately by Europeans who were schooled in racial bias stemming from 19th-20th century scientific racism.

Today, although scientific racism is out of fashion, the spirit if Eurocentrism still prevails in ancient history and fuels their biased viewpoint against blacks having a prominent role in any of African earliest civilization. Most of the books in the academia have Eurocentric views. These claims is promoted within the so called academic community.

They depend on your ignorance to make their case. This is why the average uneducated individual, including an unfortunate number of blacks find the very idea of a black Egypt and unaccepted ideology. Most have no idea and do not claim Egypt as African, it is Arabic to them.

They have an agenda to prove that Blacks were incapable of any kind of advanced civilization.

Here are some rock painting that are supposedly to be around 7000 to 6000 yrs old according to American and North African anthropologist. These are the ancestors of the original Berbers. Some historians refer to them as Iberian Berbers (Mediterranean). In North Africa, the presence of Imazighen (Berbers and Tuaregs) is nowadays confirmed by archeology and rock art as being autochthonous (indigenous to North Africa) and verifiable as far back as 7,000 BC.

The rock art sites of Jabbaren Algeria









Hachid, Malika, 1998. Les Tassili des Ajjer.
Cinquante Siècles avant les pyramides
. Paris-
Méditerranée, Paris, Edif 2000, Algiers
Jabbaren in the Tassili, dating to c. 2500 BCE per Hachid










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Old 21-Aug-13, 08:54   #55
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Some quotes about the original Berbers Of the Central Sahara being inhabited by fair-skinned people from the Iberian peninsula.
 
Pastoral Period art
By about
4,000 BP, most of the art
appears to show only
people of Mediterranean
origin.
Black African peoples have largely disappeared,
presumably taking their livestock to better watered areas in the south.


Scenes painted with brushes depict numerous
cattle in variegated colours, and clothed
people apparently of both black African and
Mediterranean stock
(Hachid, 1998; Muzzolini,
2001).
Rock Art of the Tassili n Ajjer, Algeria
David Coulson and Alec Campbell



but this theory doesn't occur with what we proved above that those inhabitants with blond hair and white skin inhabited the central sahara from the sixth millennium“.
by: dr. Mohamed ali 'Issa, prof. of the archeology and the ancient civilizations. division of the history - letter faculty- fath university
Libyan professor of the archeology, Dr. Mohamed ali 'Issa,

the lethic and the Neolethic ages", prove that the modern desert [the central desert] wasn't a desert in the antiquity. it was green with watery weather, and was covered by grasses. even, there grew many sort trees likes as the olive trees [...]. the many artworks (about 3000) in several places on the walls ... prove that there was a human variety, thus, two sort peoples [two races] that succeeded each others in living in the central desert. the first was black skinned. and he disappeared in the end of the seventh millennium BC. for any reason. and the second one was fair skinned, from the sixth millennium BC. on, and he was mentioned with the tattoos on the corps of his members that were depicted in his period”

Mohamed chafiq (hafriyyat fi allogha(h)).
Moroccan historian and Mohamed Chafiq


Notice how they try to tie the Central Saharan culture to white Berbers some &000 yrs ago. Racism blinds all racist from the real truth.


I am pretty sure these archeologistwho proclaim a European or Semitic origin of the Berbers have read some of the linguistic and forensic archaeology reports pertaining to the Nilo Saharan. Funny how they just forget about these reports, must be a case of bad Amnesia.







Origin of the Nilo Saharn/Berber language
Joseph O. Vogel (ed)
Encyclopedia of Precolonial Africa
London AltaMira 1997
the article by
Kay Williamson
Western African Languages in Historical Perspective


The term "Berberi was first used by Europeans is in the Periplus of the Erythraean Sea for certain peoples of the region of Somalia.
The languages labeled as "Berber", even though probably not called that at the time or by those who spoke it, originate in East Africa somewhere between modern Egypt and Sudan somewhere about 3 to 5 thousand years ago. It then moves westward through the Sahara and into Northern Africa among pastoral nomadic groups related to the ancestors of the Beja in Sudan, the Fulani across the Sahel and the Tuareg.
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Old 21-Aug-13, 09:28   #56
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1



2




3



4





All the preceding images which has been post by me are the Nilo Saharans/Proto Saharans. They are the ancestor of the Tuareg, Libyan tribes, Mande, Bafour or Bafur Mande and Fulani. Later I will show another tribe depicted on some Sahara rock paintings. It should be noted that we have seen Libyans and Nubians in early rock paintings.

I would like to let all readers here know that I am not an expert and have no degrees on ancient rock paintings. You could classify me as am amateur because I love to read especially African history. I have collected and enormous amount of info the last 23 yrs. Now I have seen many Egyptian art work and painting that are fraud. Eurocentrics present fake images.

Let’s investigate these images and point out some unusual findings


1 3rd image Some Resemblance of a helmet gear on head

2 3 rd image these figures have swords around the upper abdomen area

3 1st 2nd 3rd and 4th image All of the rock paintings which I have
presented lack this type of footwear. The 4th images seem to resemble
Shoes of the Roman ear










4 They do have European clothing

5 They are definitely foreigners

6 Europeans are no normally this tall

7 The artistic themes are distinct no women are seen

8 All the images with the exception of #1 have figures with a distinct
ambulatory gate.

9 Greek/Romans like cloaks around the shoulders
Granted we see Fulani men with this kind of attire but from a much late
period.

http://www.africanark.org/images/Fulani%20Herder.gif

10 They are thought to be historic, though their association with cattle appearing to be part of the same scene raises some questions

The first 2 images appears authentic and the latter 2 are photos. All images raises some questions. By comparing these images with all the Nilo Saharan painting you will notice a remarkable difference

These images appears to be more of a recent addition compared to the other Saharan rock art periods during yrs 7000 and 6000 yrs. More like 2000 BC to 1000 BC (4000 to 3000 yrs) maybe even later. Which would put them near the 18 or 19th dynasty of Ancient Kmt ( Egypt). It quite obvious they are very late in time compared to the original tribes of Libyan. However there is evidence of Europeans in North Africa from later periods
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Old 21-Aug-13, 10:01   #57
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Here we have a rock painting dated 6500 yrs. This image looks very similar to the Nilo Sahara rock paintings in North Africa. Well this image is not from Africa.




Iberian Spain
Art of the Spanish Levant southern Spain
Mediterranean Basin, also known as Levantine
Very similar coloration to the Nilo Sahara paintings
And here’s more




Cueva del Cavalls

Crete



1600 BCE paintings of Libyans sailing on the Aegean sea. Note the Caucasian Woman. Inhabitants known as Minoans
There was a thread name Sudanese1 which pertained info from Herodotus on the Pelasgians. They are the Libyans who are one of the original people of early Greece. This cpold explain how early Caucasians came to the coast of North Africa.
The ancient Egypt ( KMT) knew the Libyans well. My next post will show Libyan in KMT.

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Old 28-Aug-13, 14:26   #58
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In 1966 Basil Davidson wrote the following caption
for the quartet of figures posted on ES AE&E as "The
Tassili Ladies, 3000 BC Algeria. That is 5000 yrs which is about the beginning of the Pastoral era and around the beginning of the AE (kemet) empire.

WOMEN RIDERS mounted on horned oxen wear
capes and hairdos astonishingly modern in
style
. They are part of a scene which shows
a whole community moving to another camp.

Images of the the Berbers ancestors Caucasoid

Here's the reproduction






More images used by the western academia claiming the ancestors of the North Africans being Caucasian.

AS you can see there is something deceitful about these images



The reason for this unfortunate state of affairs is that the Tassili-n-Ajjer, more than any other Saharan region, has been subject to an appalling record of personal ambition, greed, looting, fraud, fakery and just about everything else that can give archaeology, or any other discipline for that matter, a bad name. All of this was documented in the original and subsequent versions of The Lesser Gods, which was a long-overdue intellectual and character assassination of Henri Lhote,6 the self-proclaimed discoverer of the Tassili frescoes.7 I will therefore not repeat what I have already written, other than to summarise Lhote’s main contributions to this disgraceful record. Lhote did not discover the Tassili frescoes as most of his writing and self-publicity
would have us believe. Most of the sites recorded by Lhote had already been seen by an extraordinary Frenchman, Lieutenant Brenans, much of whose work was plagiarised by Lhote and many of whose original notebooks and sketches were deliberately destroyed by Lhote. Earlier exploratory work had also been undertaken by Leo Frobenius (1937) and Yolande Tschudi (1955a, 1955b). Both Brenans and Lhote were indebted to the famous Tuareg guide Jebrine ag Mohammed, to whom the Tassili park is now commemorated and who would no doubt have brought the paintings to the world’s attention through his own writing
if he had been able to write. Lhote also set out to destroy the record (and life-work) of Yolande Tschudi (1955a, 19955b), the first person actually to record the Tassili paintings in colour and to try dating them. He largely succeeded. Tschudi is still alive and living near Zurich.


Particularly serious from the archaeological perspective is that many of the paintings that Lhote recorded are ones that he faked. At least eight of them, (and possibly as many as 12), have been identified and recorded. However, long discussions with Lhote’s copying team during the course of making the film The Lesser Gods revealed that there are “dozens of fakes”. The word dozens should be treated with caution. From carefully interviewing surviving members of Lhote’s team, my own team of researchers were led to believe that at least a dozen well-known recorded paintings are fakes. To the dozen that we have confirmed, it appears that the reference to dozens (plural) refers to the copiers’ practice of making many paintings, often merely to amuse themselves and pass the time of day, which were quickly destroyed or removed. However, even though these ‘fakes’ may no longer exist on the rock faces, we do not know if they have 120 Journal of Contemporary African Studies been perpetuated in Lhote’s notes and other records. The key point about this new information is not that the number of fakes is greater than hitherto supposed, but that Lhote actually knew that they were fakes. The copiers stated that many of the ‘more important’ fakes (that is, those published by Lhote) were done, in the words of one of the copyists, “to take the mickey” out of Lhote as he was so unpopular with his team. Some even described their feelings as “hatred”. The copiers claim that in all cases they told Lhote that they had painted the fakes.8 Indeed, in most cases it was self-evident, yet Lhote insisted on publishing them as real. Most of the copiers to whom my research team spoke could not understand his motivation. I believe that in part it was to prove his ‘Egyptian thesis’ (that the origin of Tassilian art was the Nile).9 Beyond that, the reason seems to lie in his extraordinary arrogance and psychological make-up. As shown in the film, even when challenged, by Malika Hachid, the former director of the Tassili National
Park, to remove the ‘Egyptian Goddesses’, which had already been proven to be a fake, from later editions of his book, Lhote refused to do so. For the last 30 years or so of his life he refused to admit that his team had painted fakes.


Moreover, Lhote not only washed and publicly encouraged the washing of the paintings, thus accelerating their destruction, but also reportedly looted surface and other artefacts in huge quantities from an unknown number of sites.It has been said by people who worked with him that what he did not take for the Musée de l’Homme in Paris and the Bardo Museum in Algiers went into his private collection, and that his private collection surpassed those of both museums.11 Indeed, Lhote undertook perhaps as many as a hundred excavations from which he is said to have removed (looted) artefacts without making any public record of them. Lhote also used his influence to stop other academics and scientists visiting the region, thus preventing further research (and, of course, the discovery of his misdeeds). In short, Lhote was the major contributor to the near sterilisation of the archaeological record of one of the world’s most important archaeological sites and the main cause of much of the subsequent damage to the remaining art through actions such as washing.


Source: Who Thought Rock Art Was About
Archaeology? The Role of Prehistory in Algeria’s Terror: By Jeremy Keenan Journal of Contemporary African Studies, 25,1, Jan. 2007


The value of Lhote's scholarship was also challenged by The Journal of North African Studies, an academic journal affiliated with the University of East Anglia:




Many of the claims of the expedition's leader, Henri Lhote, were misleading, a number of the paintings were faked, and the copying process was fraught with errors. The 'discovery' can only be understood within the political and cultural context of the time, namely the Algerian Revolution, France's attempt to partition Algeria, and the prevailing views of the Abbé Breuil, the arch-advocate of foreign influence in African rock art. The expedition's methods caused extensive damage to the rock art while the accompanying looting of cultural objects effectively sterilized the archaeological landscape. Any restitution process must necessarily include a full recognition of what was done and the inappropriateness of the values
Encyclopædia Britannica

This was listed on the World heritage site as one of the fakes' of henri Lhote. I should have known it was a fake in the midst of Tassili but more so since the "ladies" are wearing Ponchos and some kind of weird French hairstyles looking circa 1940s or 50s?


Hachid, who published some of the fakes in her work,
implies Lhote was aware of fraud but lent the fakes
authenticity in support of his own personal theories
on which, of course, his art crew heard him speak.

Hachid, Malika





Some rock paintings destroyed by Lhote team during their copying techniques.











There are many more rock paintings destroyed by Lhote team.

It is the boss, Henri Lhote, who's to blame for any falsifying of anthropology and history of the Algeria rock paintings.





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Old 05-Sep-13, 03:54   #59
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Libyan" from the causeway of the mortuary
complex of 5th Dynasty King Sahure
The paint has faded greatly from its original state.
The ancient Egyptians depict the first Libyans as being reddish-brown and wearing a beard.

Relief block with the heads of three Libyans Dynasty 18 Amarna Period



Amenhotep III and Queen Tiye Enthroned Beneath a Kiosk, Tomb of Anen
ca. 1390–1352 B.C. Egypt; Thebes, Sheikh Abd el-Qurna, Tomb


After the New Kingdom some Libyans are depicted as bright skinned



19th dynasty in Seti 1 tomb


20th dynasty




Libyan gladiators in Rome
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Old 05-Sep-13, 04:15   #60
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More Rock paintings from Algeria

Tin Aboteka, Tin Tazarift - Sefar


6,000-year-old



copy of the above image by Henri Lhote. Currently on display at the Musée de l'homme in Paris, the 6,000-year-old paintings show human and animal life in the early Algerian Sahara.

Head wear similar to the Dogon tribe in Mali






A woman












Very strange looking animal possible painting of a Lion
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Old 09-Sep-13, 00:33   #61
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Taharqa View Post
Actually I think whole Africa was lush green until people cut trees for energy causing climate change and some lakes and rivers dried. Some Africans managed to adapt and lived on the banks of the rivers later intermarried with Arab traders who are used to the arid desert life. While some of them just migrated south where it is still lush and green.

Check those rock drawings in the end of this video which were found in Wadi Abu Dom in northern Sudan.

https://www.youtube.com/v/tp6P_hBnF1s#t=481s width=450 height=400 type=application/x-shockwave-flash>
as if arab slavors would intermarry with Africans they viewed as inferior negros born to serve them ...I think you mean some conquered Africans became concubines/slaves castes of arabs and sumbitted to arabism as a means of survival where as the Africans further South were abe to halt the arab invasion.

Last edited by African Rebel; 09-Sep-13 at 00:40.
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Old 09-Sep-13, 16:11   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by African Rebel View Post
as if arab slavors would intermarry with Africans they viewed as inferior negros born to serve them ...I think you mean some conquered Africans became concubines/slaves castes of arabs and sumbitted to arabism as a means of survival where as the Africans further South were abe to halt the arab invasion.

AA nigger , spare us your jokes educate yourself, find out who you are , go to college , find a job , learn about your history of ancestors who were shipped like dogs to america and ended up hating themselves , stop bleaching your skin and ask your brothers in nigeria the same, stop depending on welfare...

I know am asking to much but at least try to have a little sense of pride and be slightly better than a low life AA negro
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Old 16-Sep-13, 19:42   #63
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Moving on

Tassili Rock Paintings

The earliest of these paintings from the round head period, so-called because of the human figures' rounded heads which are geometrically decorated but without features, show early agriculture and animal husbandry, again featuring elephants, giraffes and early
domesticated animals. The human figures, in dark ochre.



Later paintings adopt a more naturalistic style, showing scenes of daily life, as well as scenes showing animal husbandry and herds of cows and other animals. At this time the Saharan climate would have been humid but not tropical, ideally suited to this type of husbandry and similar to that found in parts of sub-Saharan Africa today. From 4,000 BC on the climate became progressively more arid, with desertification pushing the local populations further south.

Akba Tafilalet - Tamrit
Central Tassili region












Note the body paint which is still used today by many African tribes

The so-called Round head art, essentially pictographic, is definitely the most original and mysterious of all Saharan rock art. It is totally Neolithic and its definition is based on the concurrence of several elements: style (figuratively synthetic, pseudo-naturalistic images), technique (solid white, yellow and red colors, often with dark colored outlines), pigments and subjects, representing a strongly spiritualized mental universe, dominated by immaterialism and symbolism. An iconographic analysis of the main artistic expressions in the different stages of the Round head art reveals the Neolithic roots of African art, and at the same time appears to be one of the possible sources of African animism. The African features of the Round head art are indubitable, such as negroid face profiles, characteristic morpho-anatomies, tegumentary decors, depictions of masks and dances. The animistic interpretation is based on a number of elements which altogether show a certain coherence, on a material, intellectual, psychologic or symbolic ground. Without necessarily evoking shamanic practices, in order to try and shed some light on the mystery of Round head art it is important to investigate the present survivals of African animism. Could possibly ethnocomparatism shed some light on this art, definitely out of the picture.




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Old 16-Sep-13, 20:33   #64
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Tamrit - In Itinen - Tin Tazarift





appears to be an aardvark










This rock painting is in the same area but from a later period (Stick figures)



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Old 16-Sep-13, 21:10   #65
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Tin Aboteka, Tin Tazarift - Sefar








Note the SCARIFICATIONS on the womans rt upper arm



Reminds me of the tribes in Sudan who wear this same horned head wear



Nilo Sahara rock painting with white paint being used.


Alanedoumen - Ozaneare - Jabbaren


Ostriches without any readily recognizable body, very similar to the bodyless ostriches of Wadi Sora in the Gilf Kebir




The stony forest of Jabbaren, on the tray of Tamrit above Djanet in the south of Algeria, shelters one of the biggest roofless museum of the world. Thousands of painting and engravings hide themselves under numerous shelters created by erosion. The specialists of the prehistory of Sahara still find it very difficult to come to an agreement on origins and the datings of these rock writings





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Old 16-Sep-13, 21:28   #66
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More Rock art sites of Jabbaren



A large masked figure, in a contorted body posture that is remarkably similar to postures seen on some "Uweinat roundhead" and Wadi Sora style paintings. It has shapes resembling mushrooms extending from its arms and legs, a feature that appears to be associated with all masked figures, also noted at Tin Tazarift. It is flanked by a large white roundhead figure (with a similar figure lying partiannl obscured under the masked one). To the right, there is a large animal, apparently an elephant, and several more large and smaller roundhead figures. On the extreme left, a strange creature is apparently a composite of two front ends of some animal (like the similar figure at Tin Tazarift


Female roundhead period. Note the figure to the left with plume (feathers on top of head)


Strange image with an antelope in background and a white looking animal in front


Pastoral period


Hunting scene


All of the previous rock paintings present here in thos thread with a few exception consist of African people who migrated to the Saharra from the Nile Valley after the arid condition ended around 12,000 years ago. We have seen the Nubians, Libyans, Fulani and the Dogon.

After the wet phase ended in the Sahara around 6,000 years ago some of these Nilo Saharans migrated back to the Nile. Some traveled south and some migrated to the northern west Africa area. Many remained in the Sahara and later became known as the many Libyan tribes. My next rock painting will be the Mende tribes who as I said came from the Sahara also.
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Old 07-Jan-14, 22:03   #67
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http://www.youtube.com/feature=playe...&v/C3Jwnp-Z3yE width=450 height=400 type=application/x-shockwave-flash>
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Old 07-Jan-14, 22:28   #68
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Aouenrhet - Jabbaren




In a green Sahara, during the six thousand years
Algerian stamp in Arabic. at Tassili ajjer. The original rock painting is below





Close up photos reveal many finer details. The bearded figure is wearing a hat that is similar to the Dogon people of Mali below





Mali - Dogon
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Old 07-Jan-14, 22:36   #69
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Sefar, Tassili n'Ajjer


6,000-year-old




The rock painting above are simuliar to the Dogon figure and there may be a connection between the two. But this is just speculation however here are
several interesting claims to consider.
 
The precise origin of the Dogon, like those of many other ancient cultures, is undetermined
There several oral traditions that differ according to the Dogon clan being consulted and archaeological excavation much more of which needs to be conducted.
 
 
One of the oral traditions of the Dogon whose legends say they were guided to the area from another part of Africa that was drying up by a fish god called the Nommo who came in huge ships from the sky.
http://www.crystalinks.com/dogon.html
 
 
Certain theories suggest the Dogon migrated to the region now called Libya then moving westward in the regions of Mauritania. It also interesting to note that the legend speak of a Sky god name Amma which is their God of creation. Amma ring loud and clear to me. This in none other than the ancient God of Ammun/Ammon the hidden one. Amma sacrificed another of the Nommo, whose body was cut up and scattered throughout the universe. This distribution of the parts of the Nommo's body is seen as the source for the proliferation of Binu shrines throughout the Dogon region. (This is very similar to the story of Isis- Osiris and Horus

It has been established and proven that when the Sahara dried up in the late Holocene period, many of the Nilo Saharan migrated west into the Mauritania, Western Sahara and south into the sub sahara.
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Old 07-Jan-14, 22:56   #70
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Tamrit- In Itinen - Tin Tazarift
Roundhead figures



Fig 2
The inhabitants of the Fezzan were roundhead blacks.
Jelinek,J. 1985. "Tilizahren, the key site of the Fezzanese Rock
 
The Nilo-Saharans were known for the use of the bow. Just like Nubians which should be of no surprise because they came from the Nile Valley.
Herodotus provided such detail on the people of Africa that it is clear Egyptians of 450BC had extensive contact and knowledge of Africa as far as the western coast . According to Herodotus, the population of Libya contained two indigenous races (Libyans and Ethiopians) and two immigrant races (Greeks and Phoenicians). [Herodotus, Histories, 328-332.]


Roundhead figures - This period was named by Henri Lhote after the characteristic round headed Martian like figures of the earliest rock paintings in the Tassil.
http://docs.aprai.org/media/docs/169/1.jpg

Mende People




Fig 2 The horns are similar to the image above in the Saharan Art painting.
However the similarities does not mean that fig 2 are the Mande speakers but the resemblance between the two are rather interesting.
In this image the horns appears to come from the front to the back as instead from side to side which is simuliar to Figure 2.



Algeria
Nilo Saharan
Notice the raffia a string around the waist and the cloth in front and back. The bracelets below the knee and upper extremities are similar to the image below.


Mende tribe

All of the above have no proof that the rock paintings are the ancestors of the Mende. But we do know that Mendé people are members of the Mande ethnic group found throughout West and Northwest Africa. Now these are just my opinions based on different sources. The Mende ancestors came from the central sahara is based on the following.


1 Climates changes. The archaeological data suggest the Proto-Mande migrated first north west and then southward to their present centers of habitationfrom the sahara.
2 Archaeological evidence indicates that from at least the eighth millennium B.C. Libya's coastal plain shared in a Neolithic culture which is the use of wild and domestic crops and of domesticated animals such as cattle etc. The earliest inhabitants of the Nile were the ancestors of the Nilotics.
Cultivation of crops, that was common to the whole Mediterranean littoral. To the south, in what is now the Sahara Desert, agriculture played a role in the spread of some African groups.
3 The absence of prior evidence of human settlement in Mauritania.
 
4 Nomadic hunters and herders roamed a far, well-watered savanna that abounded in game and provided pastures for their stock. Their culture flourished until the region began to desiccate after 2000 B.C. Archaeological research from North Africa clearly illustrate the movement of semi-sedentary cattle herders from the Magreb and Saharan sites into West Africa. This agropastoral sedentary economy resulted in a growth in populations great enough to make it possible for the Mande speakers to expand across much of Northwest and West Africa.
 
5 Basenjis a Canine which appears in the Nilo Saharans rock paintings.
 
6 Nilo-Saharan languages are a group of African languages spoken mainly in the upper parts of the Chari and Nile rivers (whence the term "Nilo-"), including historic Nubia, north of where the two tributaries of Nile meet.
 
Even today, in northern Sudan the so-called Nubian languages are classified as Nilo-Saharan. Nilo is in reference to the Nilotic peoples of the Nile.

The beginning starts at the Nile. At the end of the last Ice Age, the Sahara Desert was just as dry and uninviting as it is today. But sandwiched between two periods of extreme dryness (desertification) were a few millennia of plentiful rainfall and lush vegetation.


During these few thousand years, prehistoric humans left the congested Nile Valley and established settlements around rain pools, green valleys, and rivers. There many migration into west, north and south africa during the Holocene period and after.

Then when the Sahara got dry again, all those newly distinct languages and people had to move back toward the Nile and other regions of Africa in search of greener pastures.


Modern day West Africans were not always in West Africa. During the Holocene period the Batwa people and Twa people originally inhabited west Africa. So you can that modern day Africans came from the Nile valley.


Could someone help me with posting videos here. I have a interesting video about the Climate changes during the Holocene period. Thanks

Will continue late



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-- A Sumerian Proverb
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Old 08-Jan-14, 04:19   #71
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Climates changes





One thing that is easy to notice is that From 9500 BC there is a short greening of the South Western Sahara and Sahel. (Maruitania, Mali, Niger). Prior to this there is an Arid West African coat line.

Around 8000 BC it dries out leaving a green layerd strip between the Sahel and coastal area. There is no equivalent drying in the Eastern Sahara.

Around 5000 BC this area gets even drier as far West as Lake mega Chad from that point these areas NEVER return Wet again. The same applies to Arabia during this same time span. Arabia also was a lush green area. Observe Arabia during the same periods of the Ancient Sahara.
Between 4000 and 3500 BC dessication forced a northwest and southerly expansion of Sahel by the Nilo Saharans.

During the Holocen humid period the whole Sahara contained many series
of linked lakes and inland delta comprising a large interlinked waterway, channeling water and animala into and across the Sahara, thus facilitating the dispersals of the ancient Saharans. The expansion of aquatic resources in the Holocene era made the Sahara and attractive to populations from the Nile Valley.


 
The wet climate during the early Holocene periods allowed intensive collection of grains and sowing crops ( millet) resulting in the domestication of favored animals. The impact was and explosion of settlements.



Basil davidson
Notice in the video at 5:24 mark. It shows the migration of the Nilo Saharans after the Sahara became complete arid. At the 5:32 we can the westward migration of the Nilo Saharans into Mauritania and the rest of North west Africa.
These groups that were moving away from the drying Late Holocene Sahara found suitable environmental conditions in the Dhar Tichitt, Dhar Walata and Dhar Nema
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Old 09-Jan-14, 02:51   #72
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Some of the Saharran population did not return to the Nile, some went south, north Africa. But there was a large portion that migrated west into the Mauritania region and builded one of West Africa first Empire in Mauritania at Dhar Tichitt-Walata area (Mande people) It is the oldest surviving archaeological settlement in West Africa as of right now. Now there are hundreds of migration that occur later in Africa. Different tribes relocate for many reason. The Holocene period is just the beginning
 
The earliest recorded inhabitants of the Western Sahara in historical times were a agriculturalists people called the Bafour. Eventually the Bafur were later replaced or absorbed by the Berber language speaking people. The Bafour may have been a settled people at the time of the Neolithic Era. According to their oral tradition, they lived in the Western Sahara and gradually migrated southward.

The Soninke are a Mande people are closely related to the Imraguen of Mauritania. Many of the inhabitants of the original old Mauretania were pushed south by the Arabs in turn pushing the Bafur southward.
 
The Bafour or Bafur are the original inhabitants of Mauritania and the Western Sahara whom the Imazighen first encountered. These pre-Berber agro-pastoral inhabitants of the Tichit-Walata region, sometimes called Bafour, and the Imraguen are all ancestrally related to the Mande (e.g. Soninké) who spread from that same area. Other populations in this location, immediately west and just north of this group, were in all likelihood akin to the Pulaar.


The Mendé people are members of the "Mandé" ethnic group found throughout West and Northwest Africa. The Mandé people, who originated in the region that is now Libya. Archaeological evidence indicates that from at least the eighth millennium B.C. Libya's coastal plain shared in a Neolithic culture, skilled in the domestication of cattle and cultivation of crops, that was common to the whole Mediterranean littoral. To the south, in what is now the Sahara Desert, nomadic hunters and herders roamed a far, well-watered savanna that abounded in game and provided pastures for their stock. Their culture flourished until the region began to desiccate after 2000 B.C. Scattering before the encroaching desert and invading horsemen, the savanna people migrated into the Sudan or were absorbed by the Berbers.

Mande are descended from ancient Central Saharan people, akin to the Bafour or Imraguen of Mauritania.

The sandstone escarpment of the Dhar Tichitt in South-Central Mauritania was inhabited by Neolithic agropastoral communities for approximately one and half millennium during the Late Holocene, from ca. 4000 to 2300 BP. The absence of prior evidence of human settlement points to the influx of mobile herders moving away from the “drying” Sahara towards more humid lower latitudes.

Dhar Tichitt is the granmother of the later Ghanian Empire whic was located just south Dhar Tichitt in Mauritania.



The earliest people of Liberia were Mende tribes.


Basenji of Liberia








Algeria
Basenji-type dog



Relief Tomb of Sarenput



More Nilo Saharan rock Art.

Essouk, Mali



Notice the hairdo on these 2 Nilo Saharn women, a side lock style which can be seen in the acient Libyans, Fulani ans Ancient Kemet.
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Old 11-Jan-14, 02:42   #73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by piankhy View Post
Stunning pictures.
Can you indicate whether kerma was established during any of these periods.
Kerma was an advanced society and archaeological evidence shows that ceramics were being produced by 8,000 BC - earlier than in Egypt. By about 1700 BC, the town had grown into a town of 10,000 people with a complex hierarchical society.
Osama Abdel Meguid, Director of the Nubian Museum in Aswan.





Lunate microLiths in the Holocene industries of Nubia : multifunctional tools, sickle blades or weapon elements

Although its prehistory is still poorly known.
Our knowledge of the recent prehistory of Nubia is still incomplete due to the small amount of archaeological research on the subject and the unequal geographical dispersion of studies
http://www.academia.edu/2216475/Luna...eapon_elements
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Old 17-Feb-14, 22:13   #74
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kni3ks View Post
This thread is dedicated to unlocking the some of the secrets of mother Africa prehistoric and ancient past history. The secrets of Africa history has always been denied and stolen. There is an immense about of untold history about ancient Africa history past. That’s why we have so many counterfeit or fake ideas about endemic separation between East and West Africa and no connections has ever been made, Even some of our on kind believe in these false ideas. Or brother here in America are constantly keeping up with the many excavations in East Africa and North Africa. There are many archaeology magazines, like Archaeology Archive. And several others. Many of these archaeologist have a difficult time in revealing their findings and relating the images to being black African people, but this due to their schizophrenia behavior about Black Africa.

The area of interest here will be the Sahara zone which extends north of the atlas mountains, to the Atlantic Ocean in the west, the rain forest in the south and in the east to the Red sea. The central area is an arc of shaped series of highland around the southern Algeria and extending over into southern Libya. This is the Nilo Saharan group which has a branch call the niger congo languages according to

Blench, R.M. 1995. Is Niger-Congo simply a branch of Nilo-Saharan? In Proceedings: Fifth Nilo-Saharan Linguistics Colloquium, Nice, 1992. ed. R. Nicolai and F. Rottland. 83-130. Köln: Rudiger Köppe

Farid in the archaeological literature referred to them as A-Group and C-Group respectively. Farid (1985, p.82) noted that

We can notice that at the beginning of the neolithic stage in Egypt on the edge of the Western Desert corresponds with expansion of the Saharian Neolithic culture and the growth of its population

Farid., El-Yahky.(1985) "The Sahara and Predynastic Egyptian Overview",The Journal for the Society for the Study Egyptian Antiquities 7, (1-2) , 58-65.

At the end of the last Ice Age. The Sahara Desert was just as dry and uninviting as it is today. But sandwich between two periods of extreme dryness were a few millennia of plentiful rain and lush vegetation. During these few thousand yrs, prehistoric humans left the Nile valley and established settlements around rain pools, green vallys and rivers. This was known as the Green Sahara. Some 12,000 years ago, the only place to live along the eastern Sahara Desert was the Nile Valley. Being so crowded, prime real estate in the Nile Valley was difficult to come by. Let me stop right here. The rest of Africa was at this time was only populated by the Pygmies/ Bushman. Twa, also called Batwa, one of the best-known of the many Pygmy groups scattered across equatorial Africa.

Some 7,300 to 5,500 yrs the retreating monsoonal rains initiated the desiccation in the Egyptian Sahara and throughout the rest of the Sahara. This coincides with the return of population coming to the Nile Valley and later on the Pharaonic society. Ancient Green Sahara Slowly Transformed into Planet's Largest Desert. Many of these Africans returned to the Nile while, while other groups migrated to the west, south and north of the Sahara.One of the earliest migration and population of West African lies solely through common origins in the central Sahara.

I have been collecting images from the dawn of the internet age. However most of my information and pictures are out of order and not categorized in my goodie box so I have much work to do. I had some of these images all this time and never recognized certain Africa tribes in these rock painting like the Fulani, Dogon, Egyptian, Mande and Garamantes (Tuareg). I will be back later to post these image along with the images from different archaeology magazines.


I will start in the East at Wadi Sura in the mountainous Gilf Kebir plateau of the Sahara, in southwest Egypt near the Libyan border. Then meander right across the Sahara to the Atlantic Ocean.

nice find kni3k....these paintings are most certainly of the original Berbers(ancestors of the Moors)

on another forum I found something about how a pyramid and a sphinx were uncovered in the Sahara recently from that same region(Niger) .....being an scholar on African history i'm sure you are aware of this...could you post this story? I would myself but my pc is broke and the computer i'm on want allow me
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